Theranos

Corruption anxiety

Illustration of U.S. map as a rug with cockroaches crawling out
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Dayo Olopade, a Nigerian-American journalist and technologist living in London, used the term "corruption anxiety" to describe "the knowledge that society can be and has been manipulated to favor the powerful, at your expense" in a speech at Georgetown University on Tuesday.

Why it matters: It's the sentiment that drove the Arab Spring, but it's not confined to developing countries. The Tea Party, Occupy, the Brexiteers, the Yellow Vests, even Donald "stop this corrupt machine" Trump — all of them feed from a well of broad-based corruption anxiety. As Olopade puts it: "Corruption anxiety unifies the populist left and the populist right."

What jumped out from new Theranos documentary "The Inventor"

An illustration of Elizabeth Holmes holding up her own face mask.
Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Last night I watched a screener copy of The Inventor, an upcoming HBO documentary from Alex Gibney on the rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes and her blood-testing company, Theranos.

The bottom line: It's a smart summary of what happened, but it doesn't present much new information for those who've followed the saga (let alone those who read the brilliant "Bad Blood" by John Carreyrou, who appears in the doc). Still worth a watch, particularly for some of the previously-unheard audio.