The Pentagon

U.S. tests missile previously banned under arms treaty with Russia

The Defense Department conducted a flight test of a conventionally configured ground-launched cruise missile at San Nicolas Island, Calif.
The Defense Department conducts a flight test of a conventionally configured ground-launched cruise missile at San Nicolas Island, California. Photo: Defense Department

The Pentagon said Monday it had successfully tested a conventionally configured ground-launched cruise missile with a range of more than 300 miles at San Nicolas Island, California.

Why it matters: Sunday's test is the first of its kind since the U.S. officially pulled out of the Cold War-era Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty with Russia, under which it would have been prohibited.

  • Per Bloomberg, this signals a determination by the U.S. to develop intermediate-range capabilities. The Pentagon plans to test an intermediate-range ballistic missile in November.

Go deeper: U.S. exit from INF Treaty frees Russia from key nuclear constraints

Colonel publicly accuses Trump's Joint Chiefs vice chair nominee of sexual assault

In this image, Hyten sits and listens. He's wearing glasses.
John Hyten testifies before House Armed Services Committee in 2017. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Army Col. Kathryn Spletstoser on Friday publicly accused Commander of U.S. Strategic Command and Air Force Gen. John Hyten of sexually assaulting her in a hotel room in 2017, the NYT reports.

The big picture: The Pentagon reports that the, "Estimated prevalence of sexual assault for active duty women increased" in 2018. It estimates that 20,500 service members — men and women — experienced sexual assault in 2018, up from approximately 14,900 in 2016. Hyten, Trump's nominee to be the next Joint Chiefs of Staff vice chairman, would oversee 1.2 million active-duty troops if confirmed.