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Energy system ill-prepared for impact of accelerated global warming

Pacific Gas and Electric Company crews work to restore power near fire-damaged Cardinal Newman High School on October 14, 2017 in Santa Rosa, California.
Pacific Gas and Electric Company crews work to restore power near fire-damaged Cardinal Newman High School on October 14, 2017, in Santa Rosa, California. Photo: David McNew via Getty Images

The intensity of the wildfires raging in California is just the latest example of climate change's deadly manifestations. Northern California utility Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) is under renewed scrutiny as a possible culprit in the Camp fire, which has devastated towns north of Sacramento, raising serious questions about the fitness of the utility's equipment and its compliance with state safety laws.

The big picture: PG&E is not alone in being unprepared for the harmful effects of a warming planet. Around the globe, many energy and fuel producers have been caught off guard this year by severe storms, anomalous temperatures and rapid changes to available water supplies.

Beto O’Rourke beat Ted Cruz among native-born Texans, per exit polling

Beto O'Rourke and Ted Cruz
Beto O'Rourke, Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images. Ted Cruz, Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Native-born Texans preferred Rep. Beto O'Rourke to Sen. Ted Cruz in Tuesday's midterm election, a CNN exit poll found, while voters who had moved to Texas preferred Cruz.

Why it matters: O'Rourke and Cruz had one of the hottest races of the midterms, but O'Rourke fell just short. Those same native-born voters preferred Republican Governor Greg Abbott on Tuesday to his Democratic challenger. The O'Rourke-Cruz voters correlate with their chosen candidate — O'Rourke was born in El Paso, while Cruz was born in Canada.

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