Surveillance

When governments turn spyware on citizens

Protestor holding up a canister of tear gas
Protesters in Cairo use cell phones to photograph a tear gas container in 2011. Photo: Karimphoto via Getty Images

A new report shows that a military contractor has likely sold spyware to repressive regimes. But the study's authors and other experts differ on how to stop the problem.

The big picture: That study, released Tuesday by the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab, found that 36 surveillance networks used commercial militarized spyware made by the Israeli NSO Group.

Unpatched security problem affects surveillance video recorders

Photo: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via getty

Researchers at Tenable announced Monday a security flaw in the firmware of network video recorders made by NUUO that could allow hackers to delete or modify surveillance videos or turn off surveillance entirely. It is not yet patched, although Tenable claims a patch might be available tomorrow.

Why it matters: NUUO makes hardware that records and manages security camera footage. The company's product integrates with more than 100 different camera brands.