Religious freedom

Go deeper: Colorado baker's new lawsuit over transgender woman's cake

Jack Phillips, owner of 'Masterpiece Cakeshop' in Colorado outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
Jack Phillips, owner of 'Masterpiece Cakeshop' in Colorado outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Colorado baker Jack Phillips, who won the Supreme Court’s recent Masterpiece Cakeshop case in June, alleged in a new challenge this week that the state discriminated against him over his refusal to make a blue and pink cake celebrating a woman's gender transition.

The big picture: Like the last case, Phillips claims that he cannot deploy his artistic talents to create a cake requested by a transgender woman because it violates his religious and moral convictions. The state has ruled against his decision, and this case will be a major test over whether businesses can invoke religious objections to deny services to LGBTQ people after the Supreme Court punted on giving a definite answer to that question in Phillips' last case.

Colorado baker sues state after denying cake to transgender woman

Conservative Christian baker Jack Phillips. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Conservative Christian baker Jack Phillips. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Colorado baker, who found himself at the center of the Supreme Court’s recent Masterpiece Cakeshop decision, has launched another legal challenge against the state which says he discriminated against a customer — this time a transgender woman.

The details: In the lawsuit, Jack Phillips' attorney said the baker had denied service to Colorado lawyer Autumn Scardina on religious grounds in June of last year, because she requested a custom cake to celebrate the 7th anniversary of the day she had come out as transgender.