Redistricting

2019's Supreme Court cases to watch

Gerrymandering activists outside the U.S. Supreme Court.
Gerrymandering activists outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Supreme Court, now with a solid conservative majority after last year's appointment of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, has several cases on its docket this term that could have significant ramifications on American politics and social issues for generations to come.

The big picture: The high court — with 5 conservatives and 4 liberals — has largely kept a relatively low profile so far this term, which ends in June. But it could ultimately hand major wins to Republicans, who are emboldened by Kavanaugh's appointment and sharpening their focus while a slew of hot-button disputes work their way up from lower courts.

Federal judges rule Michigan's voting maps illegally gerrymandered

Organizations and individuals gathered outside the Supreme Court argue the manipulation of district lines is the manipulation of elections.
Photo: Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A panel of 3 federal judges on Thursday struck down Michigan’s congressional and state legislative districts, ruling that they were unconstitutionally gerrymandered to favor Republicans who could "enjoy durable majorities in Michigan’s congressional delegation and in both chambers of the Michigan legislature for the entire decade."

"This Court joins the growing chorus of federal courts that have, in recent years, held that partisan gerrymandering is unconstitutional. We find that the Enacted Plan violates Plaintiffs’ First and Fourteenth Amendment rights because it deliberately dilutes the power of their votes by placing them in districts that were intentionally drawn to ensure a particular partisan outcome in each district."
— U.S. District Judge Eric Clay wrote.