Racial discrimination

O'Rourke uses slave owner ancestors find to highlight racial disparities

 Beto O'Rourke and wife Amy Sanders arrive onstage at Southwest University Park November 06, 2018 in El Paso, Texas.
Democratic Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourk and wife Amy Sanders. Photo : Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democratic Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke wrote Sunday night on Medium that he's just discovered that he and wife Amy Sanders are descended from slave owners, as he vowed to have a national conversation on racial injustice.

Details: O'Rourke said it's increased his urgency to address disparities if he's elected in 2020. "I benefit from a system that my ancestors built to favor themselves at the expense of others," he said. Unlike Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) who's descended from slave owners but opposes reparations for U.S. slave descendants, O'Rourke backs the plan.

Go deeper: Beto O'Rourke on the issues, in under 500 words

California becomes first state to ban discrimination against natural hair

An African-American woman sits on a bench.
Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) signed into law Wednesday a bill that bans discrimination over natural hair — making the state the first in the country to outlaw the practice.

Details: Newsom said the Creating a Respectful and Open Workplace for Natural hair (CROWN) Act "protects the right of Black Californians to choose to wear their hair in its natural form, without pressure to conform to Eurocentric norms." The Guardian notes discrimination in schools and at work against people of color for their hairstyles has gained more visibility in recent years, including an Alabama woman who sued after a firm in 2018 that told her to get a haircut for a job.

Go deeper: California Senate passes protections against hair discrimination