Nurses

Health care has been adding jobs for over 5 years

Data: BLS; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The health care industry added almost 24,000 jobs in August, helping to buoy overall employment growth amid economic fears associated with the U.S.-China trade war.

The big picture: Almost 1 out of every 9 Americans works in health care, and the industry has not seen a net loss of new jobs in any month since January 2014. But everyone's insurance premiums and tax dollars are funding this swelling workforce.

Why nurses are striking

Nurses stand on a street holding signs and chanting during a strike.
Nurses strike outside a California hospital in 2018. Photo: Scott Varley/Digital First Media/Torrance Daily Breeze via Getty Images

Nurses, already in short supply, have not been afraid of going on strike at their hospitals.

Between the lines: Pay and health benefits are almost always part of why any worker considers striking. But nurses, who make $72,000 per year on average, are also consistently unhappy about understaffed hospitals, saying they're caring for too many patients at once.