Nuclear war

Lack of communication spurs fear of U.S.-Russia conflict

Vladimir Putin shoots an advanced Kalashnikov sniper rifle during a visit to the military-themed Patriot Park outside Moscow, in September. Photo: Alexey Nikolsky/AFP/Getty Images
Vladimir Putin shoots an advanced Kalashnikov sniper rifle during a visit to the military-themed Patriot Park outside Moscow, in September. Photo: Alexey Nikolsky/AFP/Getty Images

"The deep chill in U.S.-Russian relations is stirring concern ... that Washington and Moscow are in danger of stumbling into an armed confrontation that, by mistake or miscalculation, could lead to nuclear war," AP's Bob Burns writes.

Why it matters: "Unlike during the Cold War, when generations lived under threat of a nuclear Armageddon, the two militaries are barely on speaking terms."

Expert Voices

Trump more hands-off than predecessors on India-Pakistan conflict

Pakistani soldiers stand next to what Pakistan says is the wreckage of an Indian fighter jet shot down in Pakistan controled Kashmir at Somani area in Bhimbar district
Pakistani soldiers stand next to the wreckage of an Indian fighter jet shot down in Pakistan controled Kashmir, on Feb. 27, 2019. Photo: STR/AFP via Getty Images

As India and Pakistan descend into direct combat over violent attacks in Kashmir and subsequent cross-border reprisal, the U.S. appears unprepared to help defuse the situation.

The big picture: The India-Pakistan salvos mark the biggest international security crisis test of the Trump presidency. But unlike his predecessors, who viewed conflict on the Indian subcontinent as an issue of paramount importance, Trump and his team have seemed content to lie low, or even to tacitly support India over Pakistan.