McDonalds

Bernie Sanders demands McDonald's pay workers $15 an hour

Sen. Bernie Sanders at a rally last year on Capitol Hill for a $15 minimum and rights to form unions. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images
Sen. Bernie Sanders at a rally last year on Capitol Hill for a $15 minimum and rights to form unions. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

McDonald's has become the minimum wage target for Senator Bernie Sanders, who is demanding the fast food chain to pay its workers $15 an hour companywide. In a letter to CEO Steve Easterbrook, Sanders wrote that such move by McDonald's "would set an example for the entire fast food industry to follow."

Why it matters: Sanders had previously called on Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos to increase the company's minimum wage, which he followed through on this week. The Vermont senator and Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) introduced the "Stop Bezos Act" last month to punish large companies whose workers depend on public assistance because of low wages.

McDonald's workers say #MeToo in nationwide strike

McDonalds employees and other fast food chain workers protest against sexual harassment in the workplace in Chicago, Illinois. Photo: Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images
McDonalds employees and other fast food chain workers protest against sexual harassment in the workplace in Chicago, Illinois. Photo: Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of McDonald’s workers in Chicago, Kansas City and other parts of the country staged protests on Tuesday against sexual harassment in the workplace and demanded the fast food chain do more to curtail the problem, reports the New York Times.

Why it matters: This is the first strike in more than 100 years about workplace sexual harassment at McDonald’s stores, according to organizers. The Times notes that low wages and the disproportionate number of young people and women working in the industry make them more vulnerable to sexual harassment. McDonald’s told the Times that it takes the issue seriously has been crafting measures to provide further protections for workers. It refused to comment on employment commission complaints, citing "active litigation."

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