Human rights

Expert Voices

U.S. increasingly isolated from the UN ahead of General Assembly

US National Security Advisor, John Bolton, speaks to the Federalist Society in Washington DC
National Security Advisor John Bolton speaks to the Federalist Society in Washington, D.C., on September 10, 2018. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

In the lead-up to the UN General Assembly meetings, the Trump administration is taking the UN to task in both word and deed. In June, U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley rebuked the UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty for including the U.S. in a report about poverty in developed countries. Then, only days after the head of the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) criticized the Trump administration’s child separation policy at the U.S.–Mexico border, the U.S. announced its withdrawal from that body.

The big picture: It's not clear how much further the Trump administration will take America's withdrawal from the international community. The U.S. helped launch the UN in 1945, but its role — and perhaps even its membership — in the organization has now been thrown into question.

Facebook seeking to hire human rights policy director

Rohingya man looking at Facebook on his phone
A Rohingya Muslim refugee uses Facebook on his phone at a temporary makeshift camp in Bangladesh. Photo: Ahmed Salahuddin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook is looking to hire a director of human rights policy to coordinate the social media platform's "company-wide effort to address human rights abuses, including by both state and non-state actors."

The big picture: Facebook has come under fire in recent years for not doing enough to prevent bad actors from using the platform to spread disinformation and stifle human rights. In March, for example, UN investigators claimed Facebook had played "a determining role" in disseminating hateful rhetoric against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar.