Heat waves

Southern states suffer from "flash droughts," record-breaking heat

Illustration of a small city heating up in a skillet
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The American South has been hit with record heat, even as other parts of the country welcome fall weather, and it's bringing a sudden dry spell, dubbed a "flash drought" with it, reports the New York Times.

Why it matters: The warm and dry regional pattern is hurting crops across the South, per the Times. But if the drought continues, "it could bring wildfires and render entire crops as losses," writes the Wall Street Journal.

July 2019 was the hottest month on record

people swimming in water in front of the eiffel tower.
Photo: Samuel Boivin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

July 2019 was confirmed as the hottest month ever recorded, slightly topping or equal to global temperatures in July 2016, according to the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S).

The big picture: Regions around the world have seen unrelenting, record-breaking temperatures this summer, causing dangerous conditions and deaths throughout. Studies have shown that the increase in the frequency of heat waves and the rise in global temperatures is symptomatic of human-caused climate change.