Health disparities

Aggressive uterine cancer rising, particularly for black women

Adapted from Clark et al., 2019, “Hysterectomy-Corrected Uterine Corpus Cancer Incidence Trends...”; Chart: Axios Visuals

Women aged 30-70 — particularly black women — have been getting aggressive and deadly types of uterine cancer at higher rates in recent years, according to new research published by the National Cancer Institute earlier this week.

Why it matters: Uterine cancer is the most common and second deadliest gynecologic cancer in the U.S. — and in contrast with many other cancers is projected to rise over the next decade. But, certain rarer types of uterine cancer have been rising more rapidly than others, with non-Hispanic black women having the lowest survival rates — and scientists don't know why.

Chipping away at the lack of diversity in medical research

Illustration of pill bottle filled with pills of all shapes and colors
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The U.S. scientific community is slowly chipping away at the lack of diversity seen in medical research, but it still has a long way to go, experts tell Axios.

Why it matters: "We are not a nation of white men," LA BioMed's David Meyer says. Because race and ethnicity sometimes play a role in how people develop diseases or react to medications, it's important in this age of "personalized medicine" to expand research to include people of color, the elderly, poorer communities, and those in the LGBTQ community.