Health care fraud

Health care's fraud and abuse laws are getting overhauled

Doctors dressed in blue operate on a patient in a surgical suite.
Doctors are at the center of changes to self-referral and anti-kickback laws. Photo: Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Trump administration is proposing to loosen regulations that prohibit doctors from steering patients insured by federal programs to facilities where they have a financial interest and that outlaw health care companies from offering bribes and kickbacks in exchange for patient referrals.

Why it matters: The industry has long clamored for an overhaul to these laws, which companies say obstruct their goals of providing "value-based care." But critics worry the broad and vague changes could engender more fraud and abuse than there already is.

Telemedicine has enabled new forms of Medicaid fraud

A man measures his vitals and sends the data electronically to nurses.
A man measures his vitals and sends the data electronically to nurses. Photo: Brianna Soukup/Portland Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

The expansion of telemedicine has enabled new forms of Medicare fraud, NPR reports with Kaiser Health News.

Yes, but: It's also given seniors more access to care, and some experts worry that the fraud could lead to slower adoption of telehealth by federal programs.