Federal workforce

Special report: Higher education's existential crisis

Photo illustration of New School students protesting tuition increases
Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo. Photos via Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

U.S. colleges and universities — historically cornerstones of society — are wrestling with a wave of rapid changes coming at the U.S.

The big picture: Higher education institutions — private, public, for-profit and not — are buckling in the face of demographic shifts, the arrival of automation, declining enrollment, political headwinds and faltering faith in the system.

Trump endorses a 2.6% raise for federal employees

In this image, Trump is standing in a forest and speaking.
Trump speaks to the media before boarding Marine One on August 30. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump endorsed a 2.6% pay raise for federal employees on Friday that would take effect on the first applicable pay period beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2020.

The big picture: Without the raise, federal employees would see a much larger automatic increase, thanks to a "complex federal employee pay law" that requires a default pay bump if Congress doesn’t legislate one by the end of 2019, the Washington Post reports.