Fake news

Social media reconsiders its relationship with the truth

Illustration of La Verité by Jules Joseph Lefebvre holding a mobile phone with the Facebook logo in place of her mirror
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

For years, Facebook and other social media companies have erred on the side of lenience in policing their sites — allowing most posts with false information to stay up, as long as they came from a genuine human and not a bot or a nefarious actor.

The latest: Now, the companies are considering a fundamental shift with profound social and political implications: deciding what is true and what is false.

Local media falls victim to partisan politics

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Political groups on both sides of the aisle are throwing money and resources at propping up local, partisan websites that are often designed to appear as straight news. Some of these sites are leveraging Facebook advertising to boost their content.

Why it matters: Local news deserts in America are being displaced by big-money politics, and the trend is accelerating ahead of the 2020 election, thanks in large part to technology.