European Union (EU)

How Europe can kick (half of) its coal habit

Coal plants in a German town
Steam rises from the cooling towers of the Neurath lignite-fired power plant in Grevenbroich, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Photo: Christophe Gateau/picture alliance via Getty Images

Existing natural gas capacity could replace up to half of the European Union’s coal-fired electricity, according to a forthcoming International Energy Agency study described to Axios.

Why it matters: While still a fossil fuel and thus controversial, natural gas emits 50% less carbon than coal. So in cases where gas is displacing coal, overall CO2 emissions go down.

Expert Voices

Trump’s U.K. state visit puts “special relationship” to the test

Donald Trump and Theresa May seated next to each other at a conference table
President Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May at the G20 Summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in November 2018. Photo: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

State visits by American presidents in the U.K. are typically smooth sailing, but a combination of British political events and bilateral tensions could unsettle President Trump's current trip.

The big picture: Trump arrives in London amid the upheavals of the unresolved Brexit issue, a Conservative Party leadership crisis and the sizable win for far-right leader Nigel Farage’s party in the European parliamentary elections. His commentary on the politics of Brexit has not always been welcome, and disputes over Huawei and other foreign policy issues have added to the strain.