Electricity

Why U.S. offshore wind is finally going big

The stars in the U.S. flag replaced by offshore wind turbines
Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

HOUSTON — Power from offshore wind is finally poised for liftoff in the U.S.

Why it matters: The U.S. has long been a laggard, but that's poised to change thanks to a convergence of forces that analysts see bringing enough coastal wind online over the next decade to power millions of homes.

Expert Voices

Power outages across Venezuela have left Maduro wobbling

Caracas streets during a power outage
Caracas streets during a power outage on March 9, 2019. Photo: Valery Sharifulin/TASS via Getty Images

Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro is struggling to restore power to the country’s electricity grid after a devastating 96-hour nationwide blackout knocked out cellular, internet, and water services, resulting in at least 21 preventable deaths at hospitals.

The big picture: Tottering from crisis to crisis has taken a heavy toll on Maduro. His regime hasn't yet reached a burnout point, but with social unrest erupting into lootings as the crisis-stricken country gradually regains power, he will likely face a reckoning for his failure to protect the grid.

More stories loading.