Ecuador

Ecuador’s president agrees not to slash fuel subsidies amid deadly protests

Protestors in Quito on Oct. 7.
Protestors in Quito on Oct. 7. Photo: Cristina Vega/AFP via Getty Images

Ecuador's President Lenín Moreno said on Sunday that his administration would agree not to terminate the country's fuel subsidies and sit for talks with indigenous groups, in an effort to end deadly protests that had roiled the country, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Why it matters: Thousands of Ecuadorians, set off by Moreno's announcement that he would end a 4-decade-old, $1.4 billion-per-year fuel subsidy, have been protesting for almost 2 weeks, clashing with police, ransacking government buildings and looting businesses. Confrontations between demonstrators and state security forces have resulted in 7 deaths, 1,300 injured and 1,152 arrests.

Go deeper: Ecuador’s president flees the capital amid protests

Riots persist in Ecuador after president ends fuel subsidy

Riot police, protesters and smoke in Quito. Photo: Martin Bernetti/AFP via Getty

Violent protests continued in Ecuador today, 2 days after President Lenín Moreno fled the capital and moved government operations to a port city.

Driving the news: Moreno is standing by the policy that sparked the unrest — the termination of a popular, but costly fuel subsidy.