Economic mobility

Nervous, angry rich countries

Data: OECD survey; Table: Axios Visuals

The world's richest countries are full of people who don't feel economically secure, and they don't trust the safety nets their governments have set up, according to a survey of 22,000 people in 21 OECD countries.

Why it matters: It's evidence of a worldwide wave of economic anxiety at a time when people in these countries should be feeling more secure. Per Bloomberg: "People are unhappy with social policies even as evidence shows they are living safer, healthier and longer lives thanks to those very policies."

Expert Voices

How Singapore is retraining workers for a more automated workplace

Commuters line the escalators at lunch hour at Raffles Place in Singapore
Commuters at Raffles Place in Singapore. Photo: Suhaimi Abdullah/Getty Images

Automation and AI has left some American workers worried they lack the skill sets to compete in a changing economy. Singapore's SkillsFuture program offers one national re-education model that aims to address such concerns.

The big picture: Since the launch of the program in 2016, over 285,000 people — more than 10% of adult residents — have participated, and 43% of Singaporean CIOs say the program has helped mitigate the economic effects of the skills gap.