Discrimination

Proposed labor rule would exempt religious contractors from bias regulations

U.S. Department of Labor office building
Photo: Alastair Pike /AFP/Getty Images

The Department of Labor is proposing a new rule that would allow religious organizations with federal contracts to "make employment decisions consistent with their sincerely held religious tenets and beliefs without fear of sanction by the federal government."

The big picture: This move falls in line with the Trump administration's record of easing regulations designed to protect against discriminatory hiring practices. The Department of Labor says it's proposing the rule because religious organizations are wary of accepting federal contracts due to "uncertainty regarding the scope of the religious exemption," per existing regulations.

Report: The political left and the right feed "the new anti-Semitism"

In this image, a man lays flowers at memorials for shooting victims, outside.
Mourners stand outside a memorial at Pittsburgh's Tree of Life synagogue on October 29, 2018 after the fatal shooting. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Rising bipartisan political forces in Europe and the U.S. have "revived old patterns that scapegoat Jews for society’s ills," Yaroslav Trofimov writes in the Wall Street Journal.

The big picture: Jewish Americans experienced "near-historic levels of anti-Semitism" in 2018, according to the Anti-Defamation League. Meanwhile, one-third of Europeans believe that Jewish people use the Holocaust to "advance their own positions or goals," according to a 2018 CNN poll — and another third say they know little or nothing about the Holocaust.