Credit cards

How banks are working with federal workers during the shutdown

Presidnt Trump waves hand, Nancy Pelosi raises one hand, and Chuck Schumer sits clasping hands.
Nancy Pelosi, Mike Pence, President Trump and Chuck Schumer in the Oval Office. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Some banks are forgiving late payments and service fees from customers among the approximately 800,000 federal workers affected by the partial government shutdown, which is in its third week.

Details: Wells Fargo will be automatically reversing monthly service, overdraft and insufficient fees, a spokesperson tells Axios, which Chase and Capital One are already doing. Capital One is also extending some loan payment due dates and waiving or refunding some credit card fees. Bank of America is working with customers on fee refunds, waivers, repayment plans and loan modifications.

More retailers are banning cash

Customers ordering salads at Sweetgreen
Customers ordering salads at Sweetgreen. Photo: Dixie D. Vereen/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

More and more businesses like the Drybar chain of blow-dry salons don’t want your money — the paper kind at least, The Wall Street Journal's Katherine Bindley reports.

The big picture: Chain restaurants Sweetgreen and Dig Inn have stopped accepting cash at nearly all of their locations, as have a Starbucks in Seattle and some pubs in the U.K. Massachusetts is currently the only state that requires retailers to take cash, but the inconvenient and sometimes awkward frustrations caused by cash bans have prompted lawmakers in New Jersey, New York City, Philadelphia and D.C. to consider taking up similar legislation.

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