Colombia

Expert Voices

Venezuela’s border showdown is reaching a breaking point

Brazilian soldiers organize sacks of powdered milk that are part of the humanitarian aid for Venezuela
Brazilian soldiers organize sacks of powdered milk that are part of the humanitarian aid for Venezuela, at Ala 7 air base in Boa Vista, Brazil, on Feb. 22, 2019. Photo: Nelson Almeida/AFP via Getty Images

The Maduro regime is using every tactic at its disposal to block humanitarian aid from coming into the country, effectively shutting its land and maritime borders.

Why it matters: Venezuelans desperately need food and medicine. A December 2018 report noted that from 2016 to 2017, 64% of Venezuelans reported losing nearly 25 pounds. Over 9 in 10 Venezuelans, and even 6 in 10 who identify as pro-Maduro, say the food supply is bad or very bad.

Expert Voices

How expansive responses to terrorism can cost civilian lives

A mother and her son dressed in a traditional costume in Pisac Sunday market day. Pisac. Sacred Valley.
A mother and son in Pisac, Peru, where health-spending cuts have contributed to a 13% rise in infant mortality. Photo: Sergi Reboredo/VW PICS/UIG via Getty Images

Recent terrorist attacks in Kashmir, North Sinai and Bogotá have put their respective government’s security policies under the microscope.

The big picture: In the wake of such attacks, there are strong political incentives to reassure the public with highly visible, forceful measures. In developing countries, however, beefing up security often comes at the steep cost of spending cuts to social welfare programs.

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