Census

2019's Supreme Court cases to watch

Gerrymandering activists outside the U.S. Supreme Court.
Gerrymandering activists outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Supreme Court, now with a solid conservative majority after last year's appointment of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, has several cases on its docket this term that could have significant ramifications on American politics and social issues for generations to come.

The big picture: The high court — with 5 conservatives and 4 liberals — has largely kept a relatively low profile so far this term, which ends in June. But it could ultimately hand major wins to Republicans, who are emboldened by Kavanaugh's appointment and sharpening their focus while a slew of hot-button disputes work their way up from lower courts.

DOJ threatens House Dems with executive privilege over Census documents

Bill Barr
Attorney General Bill Barr. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Department of Justice has informed the House Oversight Committee that it will advise President Trump to assert executive privilege over subpoenaed documents if the panel votes to hold Attorney General Bill Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for refusing to turn over materials related to the Census citizenship question.

Context: Ross and Barr have declined to cooperate with subpoenas requesting documents about the Trump administration's addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, which critics say could scare non-citizens into lying or refusing to fill out the survey. This could have major implications for federal funding and redistricting, prompting claims that the move was politically motivated.