Brain disease

How well the brain ejects waste may affect disease susceptibility

Photo of meningeal lymphatic vessels around petrosquamous sinus cells
Meningeal lymphatic vessels around petrosquamous sinus at the base of the skull. Photo: Ahn JH and Koh GY/IBS Center for Vascular Research

The brain drains waste fluid via a system of cells that can function incorrectly as they age, potentially leading to neurological issues, according to a preclinical study published in Nature Wednesday.

Why it matters: Researchers think dysfunction in the system of cells could play a role in — and be a potential treatment target for — neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis.

Elon Musk's plan to merge with AI

Illustration of a USB cord plugging into a brain
Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

For 5 years, Elon Musk has been warning about apocalyptic runaway AI, calling it more dangerous than nukes. To stave off his feared future, in 2016 he launched Neuralink, a company to create cyborgs with the express mission of getting ahead of superhuman intelligence.

What's happening: Now, Musk says he has charted the long path to merging man and machine. In an elaborate presentation Tuesday night, he said his company has installed brain–computer links in rats and monkeys and aims to put them inside human skulls next year.