Antibiotic resistance

Sepsis, the sneaky killer, is the focus of a new push for treatments

Photo of two people checking vitals of sepsis dummy in lab to train sepsis awareness
Sepsis survivor Pamela Popp checks out a sepsis medical training demonstration using dummies. Photo: John Leyba, The Denver Post via Getty Images

Combatting sepsis — the body-wide immune response to an infection that can lead to amputations, the loss of organs or death — continues to elude researchers, who are trying to develop a consistent and effective treatment.

Why it matters: Sepsis affects more than 30 million people worldwide every year, killing roughly 6 million. But, it's tricky to treat and quick to develop, leaving doctors with little option but to flood the body with multiple antibiotics and other therapies once the blood infection has developed.

CDC is investigating a multi-state salmonella outbreak

Chickens in a barnyard
Photo: Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials are investigating a multidrug-resistant strain of salmonella infantis that has already led to 21 people being hospitalized and nearly 100 infected people reported in 29 states, the organization announced on Wednesday.

Why it matters: While no deaths have been reported, officials are concerned because the strain is resistant to multiple antibiotics, fueling growing concerns about antibiotic resistance. The CDC is not advising people to stop eating properly prepared chicken, but says this outbreak strain is "present in live chickens and in many types of raw chicken products, indicating it might be widespread in the chicken industry."

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