Antarctica

Scientists find new evidence of life beneath Antarctic ice

The borehole showing the location where the drill broke through to Subglacial Lake Mercer.
The UV collar and borehole, showing the water of Subglacial Lake Mercer, from the SASA Project. Photo: Billy Collins, SALSA Science Team.

A research team drilling thousands of feet under the Antarctic Ice Sheet has found new evidence of microbial life there — life forms not known to exist elsewhere.

Why it matters: It's only the second subglacial lake in Antarctica to be explored, in an area as vast as twice the area of the continental U.S. That means scientists have to draw a lot of conclusions from drilling two holes — but it's the only way to learn about what kind of life exists in the mysterious world of subglacial lakes and rivers deep beneath the ice.

Antarctica is losing ice 6 times faster than in 1980s

An iceberg named A68 floats off the coast of Antarctica in 2017.
The western edge of iceberg A68, as seen in 2017. Photo: NASA/Nathan Kurtz

Antarctica is shedding ice at an increasingly rapid rate, potentially imperiling coastlines around the world as sea levels increase in response, a new study finds.

Why it matters: Antarctica is already contributing a growing amount to sea level rise, the study found, and things could get much worse.

More stories loading.