John Legere, T-Mobile CEO. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

T-Mobile CEO John Legere is in talks to take over the top job at WeWork after the departure of co-founder Adam Neumann, the Wall Street Journal reported.

But, but, but: CNBC later reported that "a source close to SoftBank confirmed Legere is one of many candidates being considered for the role, but he’s not the leading candidate."

Between the lines: "T-Mobile and WeWork have leadership in place that runs in similar circles," CNBC notes.

  • "SoftBank, which took control of WeWork last month, is a majority owner of Sprint and played a role in installing Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure. Claure, who was recently named WeWork’s executive chairman, helped orchestrate the $26 billion merger with T-Mobile, which is widely expected to be approved."
  • "Legere is expected to step down as T-Mobile’s CEO once the deal with Sprint is complete."

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