Feb 11, 2020 - Economy & Business

Sweetgreen bets on kelp in 2020

A salad being made at a Sweetgreen. Photo: Dixie D. Vereen/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

Popular salad restaurant Sweetgreen is buying into kelp in 2020, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: Kelp is beneficial for both human and ocean health. Sweetgreen's temporary introduction of a "Tingly Sweet Potato and Kelp Bowl" will now give the food a platform across 104 stores nationwide.

  • And kelp is a new revenue stream for fishers and aqua-farmers who're hoping to cash in on the trend. Kelp could particularly help the pocketbooks of fishermen facing depleting marine populations due to climate change.
  • Growing kelp can also help reverse acidification in ocean waters while reeling in carbon dioxide.

What to watch: The bowl will debut Thursday and be available until March 26.

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