Susan Walsh / AP

"The percentage of U.S. adults without health insurance grew in the second quarter of 2017 to 11.7%," according to Gallup:

  • That translates into nearly 2 million Americans who became uninsured. The rate, measured by the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index, hit a record low of 10.9% last year. The current rate is still 6 points lower than it was at its peak of 18% in 2013, just before the health insurance exchanges opened.
  • Why it's happening: "Rising insurance premiums could be causing some Americans to forgo insurance, especially those who fail to qualify for federal subsidies. ... [S]ome insurance companies are leaving the ACA marketplace, and the lack of competition could be driving up the cost of plans for consumers."
  • Why it matters: "The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated that 22 to 23 million Americans could lose health coverage under the House and Senate proposals."

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The nationwide K-12 tipping point

Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

The doors of public schools are swiftly slamming shut for many Americans ahead of this next school year.

Driving the news: Los Angeles and San Diego are starting out online-only this fall, forcing 825,000 students to learn with a laptop.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 12,995,037 — Total deaths: 570,435 — Total recoveries — 7,157,634Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 3,341,838— Total deaths: 135,425 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. World: WHO head: There will be no return to the "old normal" for the foreseeable future — Hong Kong Disneyland closing due to surge.
  4. States: California orders sweeping rollback of open businesses as virus cases surge — Cuomo says New York will use formula to determine if reopening schools is safe.
  5. Politics: McEnany denies White House issued "opposition research" on Fauci.
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Teachers union president on reopening schools

The school year begins soon in certain states, but we're getting further away from a national consensus on if and how schools should reopen for in-person learning.

Axios Re:Cap talks with Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, to better understand where we are and where we’re going.

Go deeper: Los Angeles and San Diego public schools will be online only this fall