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Oxycodone-acetaminophen. Photo: Patrick Sison / AP

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams today said the country's efforts to combat the opioid epidemic will need to draw on pastors, teachers and other community leaders in addition to federal agencies and the public and private sectors.

The context: The Trump Administration is set to declare the opioid epidemic a national public health emergency this week.

"This problem is so multifactorial that it is going to be difficult to have a single person at the point giving directives," said Adams, who took office on Sept. 5. Before that, he was Indiana's health commissioner and oversaw the state's response to a 2015 HIV outbreak tied to opioid painkiller injection. "It is going to take a grassroots solution."

Other key takeaways from his appearance at the Milken Institute's Future of Health summit:

  • The fixes: "Better education, better partnerships and adoption of evidence-based practices." He cited medication-assisted treatments and naloxone, which is used to counteract an overdose, as two approaches that work.
  • On reversing prescription trends, he cautioned pain relievers are effective and necessary for some at times. "We know that certain groups are disproportionately under-treated for their pain and we don't want to return to those days."
  • He's prioritizing a report about the economic facets of health. "Communities that don't have an investment from their companies as well as their government suffer disproportionately."

Go deeper

Netflix tops 200 million global subscribers

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Netflix said that it added another 8.5 million global subscribers last quarter, bringing its total number of paid subscribers globally to more than 200 million.

The big picture: Positive fourth-quarter results show Netflix's resiliency, despite increased competition and pandemic-related production headwinds.

Janet Yellen plays down debt, tax hike concerns in confirmation hearing

Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen at an event in December. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images

Janet Yellen, Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, pushed back against two key concerns from Republican senators at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday: the country's debt and the incoming administration's plans to eventually raise taxes.

Driving the news: Yellen — who's expected to win confirmation — said spending big now will prevent the U.S. from having to dig out of a deeper hole later. She also said the Biden administration's priority right now is coronavirus relief, not raising taxes.

Trump gives farewell address: "We did what we came here to do"

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump gave a farewell video address on Tuesday, saying that his administration "did what we came here to do — and so much more."

Why it matters, via Axios' Alayna Treene: The address is very different from the Trump we've seen in his final weeks as president — one who has refused to accept his loss, who peddled conspiracy theories that fueled the attack on the Capitol, and who is boycotting his successor's inauguration.