Chief Justice John Roberts speaks via an audio feed of Supreme Court oral arguments. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Sens. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), who both sit on the Senate Judiciary Committee, asked Chief Justice John Roberts in a letter Friday to extend indefinitely the Supreme Court's live audio streams of oral arguments — as it was forced to work remotely by the coronavirus pandemic — and consider video streams as well.

Why it matters: The senators say these "simple yet meaningful measures of transparency" would benefit American citizens and democracy even after the court returns to its normal operations sometime in the future.

Go deeper

Full D.C. appeals court to rehear Michael Flynn case

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

The full D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed Thursday to rehear whether it should accept the Justice Department's request to dismiss the case against President Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

The big picture: After oral arguments on Aug. 11, the court's 11 judges will decide the ultimate fate of Flynn's case after its initial 2-1 ruling last month ordered a district court judge to drop it. Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI in 2017 about his contacts with the Russian ambassador during the Trump transition, but a DOJ review this year alleged prosecutorial misconduct by FBI agents who had interviewed him.

Bill Clinton slams McConnell and Trump: "Their first value is power"

Former President Bill Clinton on Sunday called Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) vow to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg's vacant Supreme Court seat before the next presidential inauguration "superficially hypocritical."

The big picture: Clinton, who nominated Ginsburg to the court in 1993, declined to say whether he thinks Democrats should respond by adding more justices if they take back the Senate and the White House in November. Instead, he called on Republicans to "remember the example Abraham Lincoln set" by not confirming a justice in an election year.

Pelosi: Trump wants to "crush" ACA with Ginsburg replacement

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday that President Trump is rushing to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg because he "wants to crush the Affordable Care Act."

Why it matters: Pelosi wants to steer the conversation around the potential Ginsburg replacement to health care, which polls show is a top issue for voters, especially amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Trump administration has urged the courts to strike down the law, and with it, protections for millions with pre-existing conditions.