Jon Elswick / AP

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a ruling by the Texas high court that married, same-sex couples may not be entitled to government-subsidized marriage benefits.

Why it matters: The all-Republican Texas Supreme Court ruled that the landmark 2015 Supreme Court ruling which overturned bans on gay marriage nationwide did not hold that "states must provide the same publicly funded benefits to all married persons," per The Texas Tribune. The ruling suggests that not all marriages must be treated equally.

Background: The suit centers around a policy by the city of Houston, which extends benefits to spouses of gay and lesbian public employees. Despite the court battle, the city is still providing benefits to all of its married employees, the Tribune reports. This decision comes a day before the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case involving a Colorado baker who refused to provide a cake for a same-sex wedding.

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Updated 4 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 32,626,165 — Total deaths: 990,134 — Total recoveries: 22,523,822Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 7,040,313 — Total deaths: 203,918 — Total recoveries: 2,727,335 — Total tests: 99,488,275Map.
  3. States: U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases — "We’re not closing anything going forward": Florida fully lifts COVID restaurant restrictions.
  4. Health: Young people accounted for 20% of cases this summer — The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

America on edge as unrest rises

Louisville on Wednesday. Photo: Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Rarely have national security officials, governors, tech CEOs and activists agreed as broadly and fervently as they do about the possibility of historic civil unrest in America.

Why it matters: The ingredients are clear for all to see — epic fights over racism, abortion, elections, the virus and policing, stirred by misinformation and calls to action on social media, at a time of stress over the pandemic.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
2 hours ago - Health

The long-term pain of the mental health pandemic

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A less visible but still massive trauma caused by the coronavirus is becoming clear: our mental health is suffering with potentially long-lasting consequences.

Why it matters: Mental health disorders that range from schizophrenia to depression and anxiety exert a severe cost on personal health and the economy. Addressing that challenge may require out-of-the-box solutions.