Mar 3, 2020 - Energy & Environment

The oil industry's impact on Super Tuesday

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Data: EIA; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Several important oil- and gas-producing states vote today, none bigger than Texas, which produces vastly more crude than any other state — and nearly all countries for that matter.

The big picture: It also includes states like Colorado and Utah, which — unlike Texas — have lots of activity on federal lands that would be most affected by more restrictive policies.

What they're saying: A note from the research firm ClearView Energy Partners this morning points out that the oil-and-gas sector could "face stark regulatory reversals if any of the remaining Democrats won."

What we're watching: It'll be interesting to see entrance and exit polls showing how voters in the different states weigh climate and energy — and whether any of them provide fresh data on voters' views on fracking.

Go deeper: Where top 2020 candidates stand on climate policy and the Green New Deal

Go deeper

10 ways coronavirus is changing energy and climate change

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The novel coronavirus, upending our world as we know it, is also changing how we consume energy and address climate change.

Driving the news: The various impacts are occurring both now and into the future. Most changes don’t bode well for acting on climate change and transitioning to cleaner energy.

Clearing up the Biden-Bernie fracking tussle at the debate

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Getty Images photos: Ethan Miller and Brian Blanco

There was a lot of confusion Sunday night about whether Joe Biden made a big change in his energy platform during his debate with Bernie Sanders. He didn't.

What happened: At one point during his exchange on climate policy with Bernie Sanders, Biden said "no new fracking." That raised antennae about whether he was going beyond his existing vow to end new oil-and-gas permitting on federal lands and waters.

The hurdles facing Trump's planned strategic oil purchase

Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

The first White House coronavirus policy response aimed specifically at the reeling U.S. oil sector may not be a sure thing to occur as President Trump envisions.

What's happening: Late Friday afternoon Trump said the U.S. would purchase enough crude oil to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve "right up to the top," which would ultimately be a $2.6 billion purchase if oil remained at Friday's prices.