Feb 11, 2020 - World

Sudan agrees to turn over officials wanted by ICC for war crimes

Sudan's deposed ruler Omar al-Bashir. Photo: Ebrahim Hamid/AFP via Getty Images

A top Sudanese official said Tuesday that the country's transitional leaders and rebel groups from the Darfur region reached an agreement to hand over officials wanted by the International Criminal Court for prosecution for war crimes, AP reports.

Why it matters: Though he was not specifically mentioned by name, those officials presumably include Sudan's deposed leader Omar al-Bashir, who was the the first person to be charged with genocide by the international body.

  • In a conflict that began in 2003, Bashir's government killed at least 300,000 people and displaced millions more in Darfur as it brutally cracked down on an insurgency movement in the region.
  • Bashir was overthrown in 2019 after months of protests calling for his removal.
  • "We can only achieve justice if we heal the wounds ... and we cannot escape from facing these ... without the appearance of those against whom arrest warrants were issued by the International Criminal Court," said Mohamed Hassan al-Taishi, a member of Sudan's sovereign council, per Al Jazeera.

Go deeper: Sudan's Omar al-Bashir toppled after 30 years in power

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Sudan seeks to change its global image

Celebrations in Khartoum last December marking the one-year anniversary of the uprising. Photo: Ashraf Shazly/AFP via Getty Images

Sudan's transitional government has reached an agreement to compensate the families of victims of the 2000 U.S.S. Cole attack, which killed 17 sailors and injured 39, it said Thursday.

Why it matters: This is part of an effort to get off the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. Sudan previously harbored al-Qaeda, which carried out the attack. The designation carries restrictions on foreign assistance and financial transactions that have strangled Sudan's economy.

Go deeperArrowFeb 13, 2020 - World

Female protesters often lead to effective mass movements

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Mahmoud Hjaj/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images, Marwan Naamani/picture alliance via Getty Images, and ANWAR AMRO/AFP via Getty Images

Gender-based violence, WhatsApp message taxes and the rising cost of bread have set off some of the largest protests in the past year, and women were among the first in the streets, often risking their personal safety.

Driving the news: Women in Mexico have organized "A Day Without Us," a national strike on March 9, to coincide with International Women's Day. Women are encouraged to "disappear": to stay at home, away from work, out of stores and off the streets to highlight their vital role, The New York Times writes.

Go deeperArrowMar 9, 2020 - World

International Criminal Court allows Afghanistan war crimes investigation

The International Criminal Court in The Hague. Photo: Martijn Beekman/AFP via Getty Images

International Criminal Court judges ruled on Thursday that prosecutors can open investigations into allegations of war crimes committed by the Taliban, Afghan forces and U.S. forces in Afghanistan, the AP reports.

Why it matters: It's the first time that ICC judges have allowed prosecutors to investigate U.S. forces, but Washington does not recognize the court's jurisdiction and may refuse to cooperate.

Go deeperArrowMar 5, 2020 - World