Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Hurricane Specialist John Cangialosi (L) and Dennis Feltgen, the communications and public affairs officer, look at weather data at the National Hurricane Center on May 24, 2018 in Miami, Florida. Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

After watching an area of disturbed weather for several days, the National Hurricane Center has determined that Subtropical Storm Alberto has formed in the Gulf of Mexico. The storm, currently near the Yucatan Peninsula, is forecast to crawl northward throughout the holiday weekend.

The impact: The storm is eventually likely to come ashore somewhere between Louisiana and the Florida Panhandle early next week — possibly as soon as Memorial Day. The storm's biggest threat will not be its winds, but rather, its rains.

  • The National Weather Service is projecting rainfall totals approaching a foot from southern Florida to Louisiana, due to Alberto's slow movement. Therefore, widespread flooding is the biggest concern from this storm. It's also likely to ruin Memorial Day barbecues for millions along the Gulf Coast.
  • In addition, it could disrupt oil and gas exploration in the Gulf of Mexico if energy companies are forced to evacuate workers from offshore facilities.

But hurricane season hasn't officially started: The Atlantic hurricane season officially kicks off on June 1, but Mother Nature doesn't always adhere to our calendar. The fact that Alberto has formed prior to the seasonal kickoff doesn't mean we're in for as rough a hurricane season as last year either.

What is a subtropical storm? A subtropical storm has characteristics of a tropical storm as well as a non-tropical, or "extra-tropical," weather system. Oftentimes, such storms evolve into purely tropical weather systems, with the strongest winds and heaviest rains located near the center of the storm.

Track the storm: National Hurricane Center.

Go deeper

NRA files for bankruptcy, says it will reincorporate in Texas

Wayne LaPierre of the National Rifle Association (NRA) speaks during CPAC in 2016. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The National Rifle Association said Friday it has filed for voluntary bankruptcy as part of a restructuring plan.

Driving the news: The gun rights group said it would reincorporate in Texas, calling New York, where it is currently registered, a "toxic political environment." Last year, New York Attorney General Letitia James filed a lawsuit to dissolve the NRA, alleging the group committed fraud by diverting roughly $64 million in charitable donations over three years to support reckless spending by its executives.

27 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden: "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution

Joe Biden. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden promised to invoke the Defense Production Act to increase vaccine manufacturing, as he outlined a five-point plan to administer 100 million COVID-19 vaccinations in the first months of his presidency.

Why it matters: With the Center for Disease Control and Prevention warning of a more contagious variant of the coronavirus, Biden is trying to establish how he’ll approach the pandemic differently than President Trump.

A new Washington

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Image

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Friday that the city should expect a "new normal" for security — even after President-elect Biden's inauguration.

The state of play: Inaugurations are usually a point of celebration in D.C., but over 20,000 troops are now patrolling Washington streets in an unprecedented preparation for Biden's swearing-in on Jan. 20.