Photo: Thomas Jackson/Getty Images

A new study analyzed over 22,000 pornography sites, finding that 93% were sharing user data with at least 1 third party tracker.

Why it matters: Researchers said there needs to be "affirmative consent in all types of sexual activity." Sharing this type of private information can be invasive for users, with some sites' URLs indicating "specific gender and/or sexual preference, identity, or interest."

Details:

  • Per study findings, Google alone tracked almost 75% of the sites evaluated.
  • Many sites' privacy policies make no mention of such trackers, while some sites fail to provide privacy policies whatsoever.

The impact: The researchers from the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School of Communication and CyLab Security and Privacy Institute at Carnegie Mellon University said there are "larger implications for privacy across the web."

  • This applies to users who may not watch pornography, but access online content that's deemed personal or sensitive.

"The ecosystem for tracking is vast and ever-changing, so it is incredibly difficult to truly avoid being tracked online," per the study.

Go deeper: What the internet knows about you

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Ben Sasse emerges as GOP Trump critic ahead of November

Sen. Ben Sasse walks to the Senate from the subway to vote in June. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) has dialed up his spicy slams of President Trump, including this swipe at yesterday's signing ceremony: "The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop."

Why it matters: Trump increasingly looks — to business and to fellow Republicans — like a loser in November. So they're more likely to create distance to save their own skins. Sasse also won his May primary, further freeing him.

Pelosi: "States don't have the money" for Trump's unemployment order

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi claimed on "Fox News Sunday" that states don't have the funds to comply with the executive order President Trump signed on Friday, which requires them to cover 25% of an additional $400 in weekly unemployment benefits.

Why it matters: Many state and local governments have had their budgets devastated by the economic impacts of the coronavirus, which have caused expenses to soar and revenues to plunge.

Kudlow says he regrets claiming Trump couldn't use executive order for unemployment

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that he regrets suggesting this week that unemployment benefits can only be extended by Congress.

Why it matters: President Trump's decision to bypass Congress to sign four executive actions, including one that provides $400 per week in extra unemployment benefits, has prompted outcry from Democrats and even some Republicans who believe he is overstepping his constitutional authority.