Sep 26, 2017

Study: Autism is rooted mostly in genetics

People commemorating World Autism Awareness Day (April 2) in Brazil. Photo: Felipe Dana / AP

The risk of developing autism is 83% genetic and 17% due to environmental factors, according to a new model, TIME reports. Scientists studied sibling pairs — ranging from half siblings who share one biological parent to identical twins who share 100% of their DNA — and tracked diagnoses of autism among them, per the study. They also accounted for the fact that siblings may be diagnosed at different times.

Why it matters: The new model adds perspective to the debate over whether the disorder is rooted in genetics or environmental factors. Previous studies of just twins have found a 90% correlation between developing autism and genetics.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 826,222 — Total deaths: 40,708 — Total recoveries: 174,115.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in confirmed cases. Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 174,467 — Total deaths: 3,416— Total recoveries: 6,000.
  3. Public health updates: Older adults and people with other health conditions are more at risk, new data shows — FDA authorizes two-minute antibody test kit to detect coronavirus.
  4. Federal government latest: NIAID director Anthony Fauci said the White House coronavirus task force will hold an "active discussion" about broadening the use of medical masks to protect against coronavirus.
  5. In Congress: New York Rep. Max Rose deploys to National Guard to help coronavirus response.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Misinformation in the coronavirus age.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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U.S. coronavirus updates: White House studies models projecting virus peak

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The White House and other institutions are observing several models to better understand and prepare cities for when the coronavirus is expected to peak in the U.S.

The state of play: The coronavirus is expected to peak in the U.S. in two weeks, but many states like Virginia and Maryland will see their individual peaks well after that, according to a model by the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health

FDA authorizes two-minute antibody testing kit to detect coronavirus

Currently, it takes days to produce results from testing kits. Photo: Sergei Malgavko\TASS via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency approval Tuesday for a serological testing kit produced by Bodysphere Inc. that can detect a positive or negative result for COVID-19 in two minutes.

Why it matters: Access to testing has improved in the U.S. thanks to commercial labs, but the average wait time for a patient's results is four to five days — with some reports of it taking more than a week.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health