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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

An International Energy Agency analysis finds that carbon emissions linked to streaming video aren't a big deal in the grand scheme of things, but are nonetheless important to track as use grows.

Why it matters: Streaming video is one of the few entertainment options for those living under coronavirus lockdowns. Even before the crisis, services like Netflix and Hulu had ballooned in use.

Catch up quick: "[C]ontrary to a slew of recent misleading media coverage, the climate impacts of streaming video remain relatively modest, particularly compared to other activities and sectors," writes IEA analyst George Kamiya.

What they did: Kamiya unpacks a widely circulated study by the Shift Project, which claimed that streaming video created about 300 million tonnes of CO2 in 2018 — an amount Kamiya notes amounts to emissions from all of France.

  • The size of your carbon footprint created by watching a half hour of Netflix is equal to driving roughly 200 meters in a standard car, Kamiya found — and even that figure can drop, depending on if your region uses more low-carbon energy.
  • What's more, rising internet traffic has not increased data centers' energy consumption.

Yes, but: Although laptops, phones and TVs are becoming more efficient — as well as data centers and networks — it's increasingly likely that tech will be unable to offset growing data demands from 5G and machine learning.

The big picture: Americans almost doubled their streaming consumption from 2018 to 2019, and are poised to continue that pace as movies are released directly to streaming services to entertain those staying at home.

Go deeper: 10 ways coronavirus is changing energy and climate change

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.