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Streaming is now the key to dropping an album

Taylor Swift's upcoming album, Reputation

Stat du jour, from a N.Y. Times piece about the "master class in marketing" for Taylor Swift's new album, "Reputation," which — believe it or not — doesn't drop in full until Nov. 10:

"In 2014, when Ms. Swift released her last album, '1989,' streaming accounted for only 23 percent of music consumption in the United States ... Now, streaming [including Spotify, Apple Music] is 63 percent of the market."

Static for Netflix for the movie theater ... "Earlier this month, New York- based MoviePass slashed its prices and launched a program allowing subscribers to watch one movie a day in its partnered theaters for less than $10 a month. The response was instantaneous: On the first day, heavy traffic crashed the website. By the second day, more than 150,000 people had signed up," per the San Jose Mercury News.

  • "But not everyone thinks the Netflix-like subscription model can work for movie theaters."
  • Shortly after the rollout, "AMC — MoviePass' biggest movie theater partner — ... denounced MoviePass's plan, saying 'that price level is unsustainable and only sets up consumers for ultimate disappointment down the road if or when the product can no longer be fulfilled.'"
  • "AMC also said it is considering legal action to stop MoviePass."
  • "MoviePass [takes] the brunt of the financial cost by paying for the difference between the $9.95 and the actual box office ticket cost per month per customer."
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