Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Dow fell 1,861 points Thursday, the fourth worst one-day point drop on record, and the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq sank 5.9% and 5.3%, respectively. It was the worst one-day decline for the major averages since March 16.

Why it happened: Various media reports have pointed to an increase in COVID-19 cases and deaths (which had been happening for at least a week) and the Fed's dour economic outlook at its June policy meeting (which was little changed from its dour economic outlook in April).

  • But no one really knows.

Why it matters: It could mark the end of a rally that has seen the S&P rise more than 40% in the best 50-day stretch in history and the Nasdaq hit an all-time high above 10,000 points.

  • Or it could not.

The big picture: It was just one day.

Go deeper

Investors say ignore the coronavirus pandemic and buy stocks

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

U.S. economic data are crumbling as increasing coronavirus cases keep consumers at home and force more cities and states to restrict commerce, but the stock market has continued to rise.

What's happening: Bullish fund managers are starting to lay down bets that it will be this way for a while. "The reason is: You have monetary and fiscal policy pushing the economy out of a problem and that is very, very bullish," Andrew Slimmon, senior portfolio manager at Morgan Stanley Investment Management, tells Axios.

Markets swell as the economy shrinks

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The economy is sputtering, but the markets are thriving — a highly unusual event that shows how the coronavirus has thrown all bets off.

Why it matters: The disconnect adds to the wealth gap. The richest 10% of households — who own 84% of stocks — are getting richer, while millions of out-of-work Americans cross their fingers that pandemic unemployment benefits will be extended.

Exclusive: The N.Y. Times doubles down on TV and film ambitions

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

One of the country's oldest and most established media companies is starting to look more like a Hollywood studio than a traditional newspaper.

Driving the news: The New York Times has 10 scripted TV show projects in development, as well as 3 feature documentaries coming out this year and several other documentary projects in development and production, executives tell Axios.