Oct 25, 2019

The broader stock market hasn't moved much for most of the year

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Big moves in well-known companies like Tesla, Twitter, JPMorgan Chase and Ford have generated headlines this week but the broader market has been little moved. That's been true for the month, the quarter and the majority of the year.

By the numbers: As of market close Thursday, the S&P has risen 0.8% from its closing level a week ago; is up 1.1% so far in October; and up 2.3% since the end of Q2.

  • Excluding the first quarter's rebound from December's historic selloff, the S&P has risen 6.2% this year, according to data from FactSet.
  • Year-to-date the index is up 20.1%.

Watch this space: While a number of companies have posted surprise earnings beats, overall earnings now are expected to have declined 2.3% year-over-year in the quarter, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

Go deeper

It could be a wild week for the stock market and economic reports

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This week will set the table for the fourth quarter in what's been a wild and highly unusual year. The stock market has risen more than 20% in 2019, but that's largely been because of a recovery from December's selloff in the first quarter.

The big picture: "Everybody’s squared up" in anticipation, says Ellis Phifer, market strategist at Raymond James. But this week has the potential for "all hell to break loose."

Go deeperArrowOct 28, 2019

Investors more bullish on good earnings and less bearish on bad

Photo: Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. stock market investors are showing their bullish bias this earnings season, buying big on companies that beat expectations and going easy on selling companies that miss.

What's happening: "Shares of companies that topped forecasts rose an average of 2% in the two days after reporting results, beating the five-year average of 1%, according to data compiled by FactSet. Those that fell short have averaged a 2.1% pullback, below the half-decade average of 2.6%," WSJ's Michael Wursthorn reports.

Go deeperArrowNov 4, 2019

A Teflon earnings season

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With Q3 earnings season nearly over, investors are applauding, even cheering companies that fall short of expectations or signal next quarter won't be as rosy as previously thought.

Why it matters: Investors' renewed optimism that's pushed stock prices to all-time highs is giving businesses more leeway than in the past.

Go deeperArrowNov 19, 2019