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Photo: AFP via Getty Images

Steven Sinofsky, the former Microsoft executive and current Andreessen Horowitz board partner, has been working on a book chronicling what he learned during his decades at Microsoft, including his time leading the Office and Windows teams.

Why it matters: There are a lot of lessons today's tech giants can learn from Microsoft's experiences — and Sinofsky was at Microsoft for many of its most crucial moments.

"I'm so often asked by founders and execs at big companies 'why' or 'how' or 'what were you thinking' about the products I was fortunate enough to work on at Microsoft that I thought I would write down the stories about organization, management, culture, that I often share."
— Sinofsky, in an interview with Axios

What he's saying: In an excerpt published Monday night on Fast Company's website, Sinofsky recalls early security headaches — including the ILOVEYOU email worm, which infected computers 20 years ago this week.

  • "ILOVEYOU hit Microsoft at a time when we were emerging from the early days of the PC as a tech enthusiast product transitioning to a full-on enterprise company," Sinofsky told me on Monday.
  • "Much of what I share in the excerpt is about coming to grips with the importance of trust with customers while at the same time balancing the openness of platforms with the need to maintain safety and security."

The backstory: Sinofsky said he had hoped to publish the book soon, but like many other things, the plans have been disrupted by the pandemic.

  • "The timing for completing the project depends on how quickly the publishing market returns to its new normal," he told Fast Company in a Q&A accompanying the excerpt.

Go deeper

Trump says TikTok will be banned if not sold by Sept. 15, demands cut of sale fee

President Trump said Monday that TikTok will be shut down in the U.S. if it hasn't been bought by Microsoft or another company by Sept. 15, and argued — without elaborating — that the U.S. Treasury should get "a very substantial portion" of the sale fee.

Why it matters: Trump appears to have backed off his threat to immediately ban TikTok after speaking with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, who said Sunday that the company will pursue discussions with TikTok’s Chinese parent company ByteDance to purchase the app in the U.S.

Aug 3, 2020 - Podcasts

White House adviser Peter Navarro talks TikTok

President Trump has relaxed his threat to immediately ban the popular social media app TikTok, giving Microsoft room to negotiate an acquisition from Chinese tech giant ByteDance.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the situation with Peter Navarro, the White House's top trade adviser and a noted China hawk, who suggests Microsoft should be forced to make unrelated concessions related to its China operations.

44 mins ago - World

Maximum pressure campaign escalates with Fakhrizadeh killing

Photo: Fars News Agency via AP

The assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the architect of Iran’s military nuclear program, is a new height in the maximum pressure campaign led by the Trump administration and the Netanyahu government against Iran.

Why it matters: It exceeds the capture of the Iranian nuclear archives by the Mossad, and the sabotage in the advanced centrifuge facility in Natanz.