Steve Bullock. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock told a CNN town hall in New York Sunday that it's possible to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2040 "or even earlier."

Details: That's much faster than UN goals for world leaders to commit to net zero emissions by 2050. Bullock pledged at the town hall to start tackling the climate crisis by rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement, which President Trump announced in 2017 he would withdraw the U.S from.

The big picture: Democratic presidential candidates will take part in a CNN climate change town hall in September. However, Bullock has yet to qualify for the event.

  • Bullock's environmental record as Montana's governor includes adopting the "Blueprint for Montana’s Energy Future" in 2016 with the goal of pushing the state toward more renewable energy, creating new jobs and providing a tax incentive for those who comply.

Go deeper: Climate change is a massive issue for Democrats in 2020

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