Aug 26, 2019

Steve Bullock tells CNN town hall: We can be carbon neutral by 2040

Steve Bullock. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock told a CNN town hall in New York Sunday that it's possible to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2040 "or even earlier."

Details: That's much faster than UN goals for world leaders to commit to net zero emissions by 2050. Bullock pledged at the town hall to start tackling the climate crisis by rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement, which President Trump announced in 2017 he would withdraw the U.S from.

The big picture: Democratic presidential candidates will take part in a CNN climate change town hall in September. However, Bullock has yet to qualify for the event.

  • Bullock's environmental record as Montana's governor includes adopting the "Blueprint for Montana’s Energy Future" in 2016 with the goal of pushing the state toward more renewable energy, creating new jobs and providing a tax incentive for those who comply.

Go deeper: Climate change is a massive issue for Democrats in 2020

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Palantir CEO hits Silicon Valley "monoculture," may leave California

Palantir is "getting close" to a decision on whether to move the company out of California, CEO Alex Karp said in an interview for "Axios on HBO."

The state of play: "We haven't picked a place yet, but it's going to be closer to the East Coast than the West Coast. ... If I had to guess, I would guess something like Colorado."

A reckoning for Russia's space program

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

SpaceX's first attempt at launching astronauts from American soil this week is a historic moment that will stress the decades-long relationship between the U.S. and Russia in space.

Why it matters: Since the Cold War, the U.S. and Russia have collaborated intimately in space. As the U.S. regains the ability to launch people with its own rockets, the future of Russia's already struggling civil space program — and how the U.S. will collaborate with it — is unclear.

The coronavirus is making it even harder to care for seniors

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Caring for older adults was already expensive, emotionally taxing and logistically difficult — and the coronavirus is only making it worse.

Why it matters: People older than 65 have the highest risk of dying from the virus, and outbreaks have been rampant in long-term care facilities. That is creating anxiety for seniors and their families.