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Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

In an attempt to cultivate more coherence among the Trump administration's foreign policy, State Department officials are asking U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley's aides to let the White House review any of her public remarks before speaking, according to an email obtained by the New York Times.

Between the lines: Haley has often been one of the leading members of the Trump administration to speak out on key foreign policy issues, from Trump's controversial travel ban to the missile strikes in Syria, and her comments don't always align with the core principles of the administration. Meanwhile, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson — the preferred voice on foreign affairs — has largely remained in the shadows.

In the email, State Department diplomats urged Haley's office to rely on "building blocks" written by the department to help draft her remarks, and stated that her comments should be "re-cleared with Washington if they are substantively different from the building blocks, or if they are on a high-profile issue such as Syria, Iran, Israel-Palestine, or the D.P.R.K. [Democratic People's Republic of Korea, or North Korea]."

Flashback:

During a White House lunch for Security Council diplomats on Monday, Trump asked his lunch guests whether they all liked Haley, adding "Because if you don't, otherwise, she can easily be replaced." He then said, "No, we won't do that, I promise. We won't do that. She's doing a fantastic job."

Go deeper

USAID chief tests positive for coronavirus

An Air Force cargo jet delivers USAID supplies to Russia earlier this year. Photo: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images

The acting administrator of the United States Agency for International Development informed senior staff Wednesday he has tested positive for coronavirus, two sources familiar with the call tell Axios.

Why it matters: John Barsa, who staffers say rarely wears a mask in their office, is the latest in a series of senior administration officials to contract the virus. His positive diagnosis comes amid broader turmoil at the agency following the election.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
6 hours ago - Health

COVID-19 shows a bright future for vaccines

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Promising results from COVID-19 vaccine trials offer hope not just that the pandemic could be ended sooner than expected, but that medicine itself may have a powerful new weapon.

Why it matters: Vaccines are, in the words of one expert, "the single most life-saving innovation ever," but progress had slowed in recent years. New gene-based technology that sped the arrival of the COVID vaccine will boost the overall field, and could even extend to mass killers like cancer.

7 hours ago - Health

Beware a Thanksgiving mirage

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Don't be surprised if COVID metrics plunge over the next few days, only to spike next week.

Why it matters: The COVID Tracking Project warns of a "double-weekend pattern" on Thanksgiving — where the usual weekend backlog of data is tacked on to a holiday.