Mar 16, 2017

Startup raises $38 million to transplant pig organs into people

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata

AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini

eGenesis, a Cambridge, Mass.-based xenotransplantation startup, today announced that it has raised $38 million in Series A funding. Biomatics Capital and ARCH Venture Partners co-led the round, and were joined by Khosla Ventures, Alta Partners, Alexandria Venture Investments, Heritage Provider Network, Berggruen Holdings North America, Uprising and Fan Ventures.

Why it's a big deal: Because "xenotransplantation" is a process by which you take the organs of one species (i.e. pigs) and putting them in another species (i.e. humans). Obviously this isn't just a cut-and-paste job, which is why eGenesis is using CRISPR gene editing tools to modify the pig organs. It's also worth noting that eGenesis isn't the only company working in this space.

Bottom line: "This pig may save your bacon." -- slogan on eGenesis t-shirts

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