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Photo: Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez announced Saturday that the professional soccer league La Liga and other Spanish teams will be able to resume their season starting June 8 as long as the country continues to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus, AP reports.

The state of play: Spain has been working to slowly reopen its economy. Teams have recently begun training at club facilities, but players are practicing individually and regularly being tested for COVID-19. It's not yet clear when the first game will be held.

  • Several Spanish teams, including Barcelona, had to cut player salaries due to a drop in revenues. La Liga said it was facing a loss of $1 billion if they did not finish the season because of the virus.
  • Barcelona's first match is scheduled for Mallorca, but there is no date on the books yet, per AP.

The German league, Bundesliga, held its first match last week, but the game was played with no fans in the stadium. It was one of the first major leagues to resume playing since the coronavirus shut down the sporting world, ESPN writes.

Go deeper: Golf could set the standard for sports' coronavirus reset

Go deeper

Aug 28, 2020 - Sports

NBA playoffs to resume after agreement on social justice initiatives

Photo: Ashley Landis-Pool/Getty Images

The NBA and its players' union agreed on Friday to resume the league's playoffs on Saturday after players refused to take the floor for a number of games this week in protest of the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wis.

Why it matters: As part of the agreement, the league agreed to work with the players to work toward three initiatives focused around social justice, civic engagement and voting rights.

Ina Fried, author of Login
23 mins ago - Economy & Business

The pandemic isn't slowing tech

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Thursday's deluge of Big Tech earnings reports showed one thing pretty clearly: COVID-19 may be bad in all sorts of ways, but it's not slowing down the largest tech companies. If anything, it's helping some companies, like Amazon and Apple.

Yes, but: With the pandemic once again worsening in the U.S. and Europe, it's not clear how long the tech industry's winning streak can last.

Texas early voting surpasses 2016's total turnout

Early voting in Austin earlier this month. Photo: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Texas' early and mail-in voting totals for the 2020 election have surpassed the state's total voter turnout in 2016, with 9,009,850 ballots already cast compared to 8,969,226 in the last presidential cycle.

Why it matters: The state's 38 Electoral College votes are in play — and could deliver a knockout blow for Joe Biden over President Trump — despite the fact that it hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976.