Mar 30, 2017

Sorry, insurers — House isn't dropping the Obamacare subsidies lawsuit

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

House Speaker Paul Ryan says the House Republican lawsuit against Obamacare's cost-sharing reduction subsidies will go forward, but that the Trump administration can use its "discretion" to keep paying the subsidies until the lawsuit is resolved. "We don't want to drop the lawsuit because we believe in the separation of powers," Ryan told reporters this morning at his weekly press briefing.

Why it matters: Insurers say they need those payments — which cover subsidies for low-income Obamacare customers — to stay in the marketplaces for next year. Ryan said that's up to the Trump administration: "While the lawsuit is being litigated, then the administration funds these benefits. That's how they've been doing it, and I don't see any change in that."

When might that change? Ryan said it could take "months." The Trump administration still has to decide whether to stop fighting the lawsuit. The ideal way to address the payments, Ryan said, is "to repeal and replace Obamacare, and have that transition occur where these markets are stabilized." And where is that? Nowhere, per Jonathan Swan.

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Scoop: German foreign minister to travel to Israel with warning on annexation

Heiko Maas. Photo: Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas is expected to travel to Israel next week to warn that there will be consequences if Israeli leaders move forward with plans to annex parts of the West Bank, Israeli officials and European diplomats tell me.

Why it matters: Israeli and European officials agree that if Israel goes ahead with unilateral annexation, the EU will respond with sanctions.

Minneapolis will ban police chokeholds following George Floyd's death

A memorial for George Floyd at the site of his death in Minneapolis. Photo: Steel Brooks/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Minneapolis has agreed to ban the use of police chokeholds and will require nearby officers to act to stop them in the wake of George Floyd's death, AP reports.

Why it matters: The agreement between the city and the Minnesota Department of Human Rights, which has launched an investigation into Floyd's death while in police custody, will be enforceable in court.

Better-than-expected jobs report boosts stock market

Data: Yahoo Finance; Chart: Axios

The S&P 500 jumped nearly 3% on Friday after a stronger-than-expected May jobs report showed that an economic recovery could be underway.

The state of play: Stocks have rallied since the worst of the coronavirus sell-off ended in late March and looked past a spate of ugly economic reports — not to mention civil unrest.