Jacquelyn Martin / AP

As a committee of GOP senators formulates their health care bill they're keeping it hush hush — not holding hearings, not hosting drafting sessions, and not saying how it will differ from the bill the House passed last month — much to the chagrin of their Democratic counterparts, and even some Republicans are speaking out against the secrecy:

  • Lindsey Graham: "We know this is not the best way to do health care…But it's the way we're having to do it."
  • Rand Paul: "My preference would be a more open process in committees," he said, "with hearings and people on both sides."
  • Bob Corker: "I've said from Day 1, and I'll say it again…The process is better if you do it in public…"
  • Ron Johnson: "I want to know exactly what's in the Senate bill. I don't know yet…It's not a good process."
  • Lisa Murkowski said most of what she hears about the bill comes from reporters. "Yeah, I got a problem with it…If I'm not going to see a bill before we have a vote on it, that's just not a good way to handle something that is as significant and important as health care."
  • Bill Cassidy: "Would I have preferred a more open process? The answer is yes."
  • Jerry Moran: "I want every senator, all 100 of us, to have the chance to offer amendments, make suggestions, take votes."

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