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Social media ad rules may not be ready before midterms

Photo: Jaap Arriens / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Proposals seeking to thwart foreign influence on U.S. elections by requiring social media companies to disclose who is behind political ads on their platforms may not go into effect in time for this year’s midterm election, the Washington Post reports.

  • The Federal Election Commission's Republican Chairwoman Caroline Hunter said, "the commission has been reluctant to change the rules of the game in the middle of the election season, so that would be something we would want to seriously consider." Vice Chairwoman Ellen Weintraub countered, “Are people really going to say, ‘Oh, it’s too late in the game to run a disclaimer now.' I don’t really buy that.”
  • The details: The FEC delayed a vote on Thursday to advance the proposed rules, per the Post. Commissioners plan to meet next week to present a proposal and begin the public comment process, which Hunter said is "going to take a little bit of time."
Haley Britzky 9 hours ago
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Zuckerberg happy to testify if it is "the right thing to do”

A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Jaap Arriens / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he would be "happy" to testify before Congress if it was "the right thing to do," in an interview with CNN's Laurie Segall.

Why it matters: Facebook has been under the microscope lately for what Zuckerberg called earlier today the "Cambridge Analytica situation." Zuckerberg said if he was the "person...who will have the most knowledge," then he'd be the one to testify in the face of Facebook's data-collection situation.

Bob Herman 7 hours ago
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Jamie Dimon's $141 million payday

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event.
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event in 2016. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon took home more than $141 million in 2017 after calculating the actual realized value of his stock, according to a preliminary draft of the banking giant's annual proxy document. Dimon's compensation is calculated as $28.3 million when using the estimated fair value of his stock. But that compensation figure doesn't matter as much because it doesn't reflect what executives report in their personal income tax filings.

Why it matters: It's the highest pay package of any active corporate CEO from 2017, based on Securities and Exchange Commission documents that have been filed thus far. Dimon's compensation is also 1,818 times higher than what the average JPMorgan employee makes.